Trishant is a Research Assistant with the Smart Forests project in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. He is a conservation geographer with a decade-long experience and interest in the socio-politics and geographies of wildlife conservation. Trishant started his career as a conservation biologist studying large carnivores and human wildlife conflict. Working on the interface of conservation science and conservation practice/policy, he quickly realized the importance of social and political sciences in the field of environmental conservation.

Following his postgraduate studies in Conservation and Rural Development his interests shifted significantly from the natural sciences to the social sciences and humanities. His research interests now focus on the rising discourse of conservation militarisation, links between the illegal wildlife trade and armed conflicts, and conservation practice in violent environments.

His PhD research in the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge investigates the implications of using conservation surveillance technologies for wildlife conservation in India. His research focuses on how digital technologies are transforming the socio-politics of conservation environments. Using an intersectionality lens, Trishant investigates what these transformations mean for conservation labour and the future of conservation work in the Global South.


Publications

His PhD research in the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge investigates the implications of using conservation surveillance technologies for wildlife conservation in India. His research focuses on how digital technologies are transforming the socio-politics of conservation environments. Using an intersectionality lens, Trishant investigates what these transformations mean for conservation labour and the future of conservation work in the Global South.